Cold Water

Premium Wall Bias Lighting, Part 3

I haven't forgotten about you. Some private stuff kept me from completing this project for a while. To make it up, I have added OpenSCAD files for a 3D printed case.

The controller was a little tricky to complete, mostly because of the very different component heights. I decided to use two circuit boards that are stacked onto each other by headers.

On the upper board, there are only the two buttons and the LCD, as well as the transistor and resistor for the LCD backlight. As I only used one-layer TriPad strip boards, I had to use this one upside down for the male headers to point downward. This rather unconventional use made it a little tricky to solder the buttons and LCD headers on the actual bottom side of the board.

The soldered controller boards. The lower board contains all the other components, as well as the wiring. The rotary encoder also made it to the lower board, because it is much taller than the other buttons. This way, the top of the button caps are almost level and nice to look at.

The result is surprisingly compact for a DIY solution. The button caps and the LCD are just perfectly positioned for a case.

With plastic feet attached, you can use the controller as it is. You can also get a plastic case with transparent top, drill three holes in it for the button caps, and mount the sandwich with spacers. But if you have the chance, you should definitely go for a 3D printed case.

I have set up a project at GitHub. It contains the circuit diagram, the bill of materials, the firmware source code, and OpenSCAD files for a printed case. There is no firmware binary yet, as you need to adapt the source code to the length of your LED strip anyway.

You will find the OpenSCAD files for the case in the GitHub project. There are bonus OpenSCAD files in the project, for printing a customized case. Due to the absence of properly layouted PCBs, I am aware that each controller is going to look differently when finished. In the parameter.scad file, you can change all kind of parameters, so you should be able to make your individual case in, well, almost any case (silly pun intended). ­čśä

The SPI flash memory of the Feather M0 Express is not used yet. In a future release, I may add a settings menu for the LED strip size. The controller is also forgetting all its settings when disconnected from the power. This needs to be addressed in a future release as well.

But after all, this is a start for your own DIY wall bias lighting. Feel free to send pull requests for enhancements!

Again, remember that you must remove the jumper before connecting the Feather to an USB port, otherwise your computer will be damaged.

Cura mag OpenSCAD nicht mehr

Zumindest vor├╝bergehend. Sobald man versucht, eine aus OpenSCAD exportierte stl-Datei in Cura zu importieren, erscheint die Fehlermeldung "Ung├╝ltige Datei".

Der Grund daf├╝r ist, dass Cura auf manchen Plattformen momentan Probleme hat, stl-Dateien im ASCII-Format zu lesen. Und OpenSCAD exportiert nur in ASCII-Format.

Als Workaround hilft ein Universal-Taschenmesser f├╝r stl-Dateien namens admesh. Neben etlichen anderen Transformationsm├Âglichkeiten konvertiert es eine ASCII-stl-Datei ins Bin├Ąrformat:

admesh -b example-bin.stl example-ascii.stl

Diese l├Ąsst sich dann in Cura problemlos ├Âffnen.

admesh ist im Fedora Repository verf├╝gbar und kann (auf Wunsch inklusive einer GUI) einfach per dnf installiert werden:

sudo dnf install admesh admeshgui