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Dev.Linux

Enable Synology's hibernation debugger

If you own a Synology NAS, you probably know the trouble that it frequently wakes up from hibernation without any obvious reason. Synology has added a more or less undocumented debugger for that issue. If enabled, it will log the reason for waking up from its beauty sleep, so one can take measures against it.

WARNING: This article is targeted at experienced Linux users. Even if you manage to enable the debug mode, you still have to analyze the log files, find a solution to your individual problem, and assess if it is safe to apply. If you make a mistake, you can cause a lot of damage to your system and your data. Please take this advice seriously.

In any case, make sure your data is properly backed-up. Remember that a RAID is not a backup!

Also note that the debug mechanism has changed from time to time, so it may be completely different on your NAS depending on the DSM version that is used.

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DS3231 RTC on Raspberry with Fedora

A minor downside of the Raspberry Pi is that it is not equipped with a battery backed-up real-time clock. After every reboot, the system time is messed up and needs to be corrected by NTP, which in turn requires a network connection.

Luckily, there are readily assembled RTC modules available. They base on the DS3231 real time clock chip. A tiny battery is keeping the time when the Raspberry is disconnected from power. You can find those modules for less than two Euros a piece at marketplaces like Amazon, eBay, or Alibaba. The module is just plugged onto the pin header of the RasPi.

It is quite easy to use the RTC on Raspbian. On Fedora for Raspberry Pi, the installation was a little more tricky though.

In a first step, the RTC must be added as a new I²C device:

/usr/bin/echo ds3231 0x68 > /sys/class/i2c-adapter/i2c-1/new_device

(If you have a Raspberry Rev 1, you'd use /sys/class/i2c-adapter/i2c-0/new_device instead.)

The RTC does not store the time zone, so we need to tell the system that we'd like to use the system's time zone:

timedatectl set-local-rtc 0

And finally we copy the current system's time to the RTC chip:

hwclock -w

The RTC is now set up and ready for operation. But we're not done yet. When the system boots up, the DS3231 is unknown to the system again. We have to add a systemd service for adding it and reading the time, by creating a file called /etc/systemd/system/my-rtc.service with the following content:

[Unit]
Description=Enable battery backed-up RTC
Before=basic.target
After=sysinit.target
DefaultDependencies=no

[Service]
Type=oneshot
RemainAfterExit=yes
ExecStartPre=-/usr/bin/bash -c '/usr/bin/echo ds3231 0x68 > /sys/class/i2c-adapter/i2c-1/new_device'
ExecStartPre=-/usr/bin/sleep 0.2
ExecStart=/usr/sbin/hwclock -s

[Install]
WantedBy=basic.target

The service is enabled via:

systemctl enable my-rtc

And now every time the system boots up, the DS3231 is added as I²C device and the system clock is set to the time found in the RTC. If a network is available, NTP will later take over and set the network time.

It's not the most elegant solution, I guess. I had to add a sleep command because it turned out that the hardware is not immediately available after adding the device. I'd like to hear from you if you found a better way.

Remember to manually use hwclock -w from time to time, to reset the RTC to the correct time. If you shut down your RasPi frequently, you could add another systemd service that automatically writes the current time on system shutdown.

CircuitPython and Fedora

The season of long winter nights is coming, so I got myself an AdaFruit Circuit Playground Express for some home decoration.

My plan is to program it using CircuitPython, a MicroPython derivate that is adapted to the AdaFruit hardware.

CircuitPython must be installed to the Circuit Playground first, which turned out to be difficult with Fedora Linux in a first attempt. The troublemaker was the ModemManager, which is still installed by default. It detects the serial port of the AdaFruit device, and then hogs this resource because, well, it might be a modem. 🙄

My older readers certainly still remember what a modem is. 😉 But to make a long story short, almost no one is using a serial modem nowadays, so the ModemManager does not serve any useful purpose. However, it cannot be removed, because other important packages still depend on it. The only way is to stop it permanently:

sudo systemctl stop ModemManager
sudo systemctl disable ModemManager

After that, I could finally install CircuitPython to the Circuit Playground. First I downloaded the matching uf2 file. After that, I connected the Playground via USB, and changed to the bootloader mode by pressing its reset button twice (like a double-click).

The Circuit Playground is now mounted as an USB drive called CPLAYBOOT. All there is to do now is to copy the uf2 file to this drive. The Playground automatically reboots after that. If everything went fine, it will come back as an USB drive called CIRCUITPY.

The next step is to install the AdaFruit libraries to that drive. I downloaded the latest library bundle that matched my CircuitPython version, and just unpacked it to the CIRCUITPY drive.

That's it... All there is to do now, is to open the code.py file in an editor and change the code. It is immediately executed when it is saved.

For a start, there are a lot of code examples for the Circuit Playground Express on the AdaFruit web site.

Setting up TP-Link TL-SG108E with Linux

UPDATE: It seems that starting with hardware version 2, these switches have an actual web interface. Too sad my ones are version 1. 😢

Frankly, I didn't expect it and I was somewhat disappointed when I found out that the TP-Link TL-SG108E Easy Smart Switch (and its little brother TL-SG105E) cannot be configured via web browser. And I was even more disappointed when I found out that, even though Linux and MacOS were listed on the retail box, the configuration tool Easy Smart Configuration Utility runs on Windows only. And they mean it! When started in a Windows VM, the utility does not see any switches.

So the devices are rather cheap for a smart switch, but they still come with a price: no web interface.

However, thanks to some help in the interwebs, I was finally able to run the Configuration Utility on Fedora Linux. It's not that easy, though.

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